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    ER System Works HomeSite MapDrop us a line Fun StuffPC BasicsSearch our library   

ER Computers
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Glossary V-Z
 
The Keyboard
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CTRL
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Special Characters
Cdn Keyboard
US Keyboard
Shortcuts
 
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Clean Registry
Clean Uninstalls
DLL file Errors
Error Codes
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Paint
Word
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Screen
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Save
Working with Text
 
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    ER System Works HomeSite MapDrop us a line Fun StuffPC BasicsSearch our library   

ER Computers
Welcome Message
About
Awards
Comments
Mission
 
Basics
Introduction
Mouse Basics
Computer Terms
Glossary A
Glossary B-C
Glossary D-E
Glossary F-I
Glossary J-K
Glossary L-O
Glossary P-R
Glossary S-U
Glossary V-Z
 
The Keyboard
Key Descriptions
ALT
CTRL
Shift
Home
Page Up
Page Down
 
Actions
Conventions
Shortcuts
Select Text
 
Special Characters
Cdn Keyboard
US Keyboard
Shortcuts
 
Acronyms
File Extensions
Downloads
 
Common Problems
Annoyances
Crashes
Clean Registry
Clean Uninstalls
DLL file Errors
Error Codes
Internet Problems
Malware
Mobile Issues
Print Issues
Slow PC Fixes
Troubleshooting
Software Help
Internet Explorer
Introduction
Toolbar
Navigate
Favorites
Send URL
Printing
 
Excel
Introduction
General
Toolbar
Screen
Keyboard
 
Outlook
Outlook Express
Windows
Accessories
Entertainment
Paint
Word
General
Screen
Toolbars
Ruler
Save
Working with Text
 
WordPerfect
 

 

Computer Basics

Answer to FAQ

Would the system run all files with that filename? And would those files run in the order listed in the directory, or do the extensions have a priority?  

Hello,

Thank you for your question.  In response, complete file names include the extension.  So technically, you cannot have duplicate files within the same folder/directory.   That is a computing no no.  It should be noted, however, you can have duplicate files in your computer, but they must be in different folders.
 
When you speak about running a filename, I presume you are using the 'Run' command from the Start menu.  If that is the case, the computer will go to the Windows folder and run only the filename with the .exe extension on it.  You can only run exe files (executable).  There are several different kind of executable files, (com or bat) but with today's technology most programs use exe files to launch.
 
The first part of file names are often duplicated, but each serves a different purpose in the system.  As an example, ini are program information files and inf are hardware information files that Windows uses.   gif, jpg, pcx, bmp and tif are different kinds of picture files. 
 
As a final note, your computer has been told what program to use when you double click on most files.  If it doesn't know what program to use, when you double click on a file, a window will open and ask you to choose from the programs you have on your computer.  For example, if you downloaded a pdf file (which needs Adobe Acrobat reader) and you don't have it on your computer, you would be asked what to use.  In this case, it wouldn't matter what program you chose, none of your programs would work.  You would have to go to adobe, download and install acrobat reader before you could open the pdf file.
 
I hope this answers your question. 

 

 

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